Speaker 2017

Patron: Senator for Interior Affairs and Sports, Andy Grote

Patron: Senator for Interior Affairs and Sports, Andy Grote

Andy Grote is the Senator for Interior Affairs and Sports at the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg

  • 1968 born in Erpen
  • 1974-1978 Primary school in Büsum
  • 1978-1987 North Sea high school Büsum
  • 1987-1989 Two-year service Bundesmarine, destroyer „Hessen“, Wilhelmshaven
  • 1990-1996 Study of Law, University of Hamburg
  • 1997-1999 Legal representative office in Hamburg and Washington D.C.
  • 2000-2001 Scientific Advisor for Federal and European Affairs, Building Authority of the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg,
  • Member of the Hamburgische Bürgerschaft, twice directly elected in the constituency 1 (Hamburg-Mitte)
  • 2002-2008 Member of Hamburg-Mitte district council
  • 2002-2012 Attorneys at law
  • 2004-2008 Chairman of the SPD parliamentary group in the district council
  • 2012-2016 District Manager Hamburg-Mitte
  • since 20. January 2016 Senator of the Behörde für Inneres und Sport

(Bild: Bina Engel)

 

State Secretary Christoph Holstein

State Secretary Christoph Holstein

  • born in November 1963
  • 1993-1998 Journalist, Schleswig-Holsteinischer Zeitungsverlag
  • 1998- 2001 Spokesperson; Ministry of Interior and Sports
  • 2001- 2004 Spokesperson, Social Democratic Party (SPD), Hamburg
  • 2004- 2011 Spokesperson, SPD-Bürgerschaftsfraktion (regional parliament), Hamburg
  • 2011- 2015 Spokesperson; Senat of the Free an Hanseatic City of Hamburg; and Head of Mediadepartment
  • since April 17th 2015 State Secretary of Sports; Ministry of the Interior and Sports; Hamburg
Dr. Sandra Alspach

Dr. Sandra Alspach

Dr. Sandra Alspach completed a B.A. in English at Miami University (Ohio) and taught public school for 15 years before earning a doctoral degree in Communication at Ohio University.

During her high school teaching years, she earned a Masters in Theatre History and Dramatic Literature at Ohio University and taught college courses at Ohio University-Lancaster Campus. She performed in, wrote, and directed plays in the public schools and in the community theatre. She directed high school speech and debate competition activities.

Upon completion of the Ph.D., with a focus on collective bargaining in public education, she taught an array of Communication courses at Hope College in Holland, Michigan for six years. She continued to coach forensics (speech and debate) at the college level. In 1993 she moved to Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Michigan.

From 2007 to 2009 she served as President of Pi Kappa Delta national forensics honor society. At Ferris State, she has advanced to Professor with Sports Communication as her teaching specialty, and currently serves as a Member of the Board for the International Association for Communication and Sport.

She has authored textbooks in Communication Theory and Public Speaking and contributed extensively at conferences especially in the area of Communication pedagogy.

Besides Sports Communication, she is well-versed in the teaching of courses in diversity and intercultural communication.

Sandy’s husband Greg recently retired from 40+ years as a public school teacher.  Their daughter Lydia continues the family tradition, teaching Special Education in Wisconsin. They dote on their grandson Will who is an avid gamer and a blue belt in karate.  They enjoy travel and have taken students on Study Abroad trips to Scotland, Ireland, and England since 2001. They look forward to spending time in the summer at their cottage in northern Ontario.

 

PRESENTATION

In her presentation, Dr. Sandra Alspach will focus on „The “Digital Stadium” Project at Ferris State University: Engaging undergraduates in authentic research in sport and Social Media“.

Abstract

The undergraduate program in Sports Communication has existed at Ferris State University (Michigan USA) since 2011.  The keystone course Sports Communication introduces students to career opportunities in the Sports industry and features a project-based learning pedagogy consistent with the mission of the University.  But we felt the need to prepare students for research as we became increasingly aware of opportunities for advanced study in the field.  The explosion of research on sport and social media offered an accessible way to engage students in doing actual research by studying the communication tools they were already using to engage in sport fandom.

We created a research project in the Sports Communication course to introduce students to the process of collecting and analyzing data.  At the 2014 Summit of the International Association for Communication and Sport (IACS) in New York City, two seniors reported our pilot study in which the class analyzed Twitter use by athletes and athletic organizations.  In 2016, we advanced the research project to a higher level by inviting students who were taking the Sports Communication course concurrently with the Research Methods course to address a fresh research question and to authentically attempt to answer it.

The result of this collaboration has been the establishment of a research agenda we call the “Digital Stadium Project.”   The first report of this project, “The ‘Digital Stadium’:  Social Media and the Influence of Fandom on Athlete Performance,” was presented at the 2017 IACS Summit in Phoenix. We learned that the potentially disappointing result of a null finding actually contributes to our knowledge and it also stimulates student interest in conducting authentic research.  Returning students have already begun work on “Digital Stadium.2” analyzing professional American basketball.

Fernando Borges

Fernando Borges

Fernando Borges is a researcher at CPES – Center of Research and Social Studies at Lusófona  University, in Lisbon. He is currently at his last year of his PhD, at Université Panthéon-Assas (Paris 2), where he research Football Club´s own Media Channels, comparing 3 organisations: Benfica-Por;  Paris Saint-Germain-Fra, Botafogo-Bra.

His doctorate was fundend by CAPES Foundation, Ministery of Education, Brazil.

 

PRESENTATION

He would like to talk about “Mediatization of Football Clubs”.

Abstract

The aim of this research is to analyze the way soccer clubs engage with their fan base. Following the digital revolution, direct communication between public and organizations became easier and less expensive. Thus, soccer clubs invested in their own media and communication channels to reach their fans, in order to enhance their connection.

In theoretical terms, we want to frame our research inside mediatization theory (Hjarvard, 2008). Nowadays, it is no longer possible to separate the media from the social fabric. We live inside the media, and we are constantly consuming media anytime, anywhere and from any device. We live in a time where organizations have to find constant new ways to draw attention to their messages. Despite the fact that live sports are one of the few things that still has its main value at the time when it takes place, the explosion of entertainment options make more difficult to attract fans.

To be media savvy and to have visibility is an important factor for success. Mediatization is a social phenomenon where the media logic influence society and organizations. Following the perception that communication and media, especially new digital technologies, are important tools, sports organizations change their structure, becoming more complex, and also their behavior to match their aspirations (Frandsen, 2015). Mediatization must be placed alongside with other social process, such as globalization, commodification and individualization. Mediatization helps to optimize interactions – more interactions simultaneously -, and also increases virtualization, allowing organizations to detach from territories and reaching distant fans. As part of the entertainment industry, soccer is a good example of the Experience Economy (Pine and Gilmour, 1998). For the past decades, symbolic elements became important inside organizations: brand building and storytelling tools became key elements for economic success. Thus, sports organizations have to put in place marketing and communication strategies to enhance the fan experience (Desbordes and Richelieu, 2011) to stablish a more perennial connection.

For this project, we use a “ethnographical-interview” approach (Beaud and Weber, 2010). Our field work was done at three different soccer clubs, Benfica, Botafogo and Paris Saint-Germain, in three countries, Portugal, Brazil and France, where we interviewed content and media professionals from the clubs. Our goal was to understand the organizations, business models, objectives and work routines of the club TV channels and their strategies. These professionals offer an inside look of those organizations that are usually very closed.

Often, soccer clubs represent communities, so being very linked to their local territory and population. However, commercialization and professionalization of the game pushed away these traditional links. Rationalization and professionalization are important aspects inside the sports organizations. As these process advances, the organization become more complex and become capable to invest in different aspects of the sports field. At the present, clubs are able to control the flux of communication, employing media consultants, public relations and producing their own content. Television is a vital factor of success. Broadcasting rights are one of the most important source of revenues for sports. Also, visibility provided by TV pushes commercial contract and even ticket sale. To be capable to control the communication flux is empowering for soccer clubs to negotiate new contracts. Taking into account the soccer clubs viewpoint, we want to discuss the reasons they decided to invest in their own media and communication channels. After our analyses, we identified that soccer clubs aims to booster the emotional and mediated connection with fans, creating a strong community.

Sports consumption happens in three phases: before, during and after the matches. Media have a key role before and after (with news, game analyses, interviews, etc.) and an accessory role during the game (second screen or Wi-Fi at the stadiums). So, by investing in the production of sports content, soccer clubs try to engage with fans all the time. Analysis of the content produced (nostalgia videos and past glorious matches, intimate moments for players and staff, dressing rooms and training grounds, youth team matches) may offer a view that the strategy includes past, present and future connection.

Finally, we consider that the media channels owned by the clubs have a phatic function. For the sake of interaction, these channels serve to form and sustain a community of fans spread over a country or the globe. They identify with a specific club, but this relationship must be nurtured virtually, based on mediated interactions.

Prof. Dr. Raymond Boyle

Prof. Dr. Raymond Boyle

Prof. Dr. Raymond Boyle is a Professor of Communications and Deputy-Director of the Centre for Cultural Policy Research at the University of Glasgow.

He has published widely on sports and media issues and is author/co-author of a number of books on the subject including Power Play: Sport, the Media and popular Culture (2009). He has also researched the television and film industries and co author of The Television Entrepreneurs (2012) and the Rise and Fall of the UK Film Council (2015).

He also edited the four volumes of the Sage collection on Sport and Communication published in 2016. He works with UEFA in the delivery of their Certificate in Football Management (CFM) programme to national football associations across Europe.

He sits on the Board of Media, Culture and Society and on the advisory boards of Communication and Sport and Leisure Studies.

 

PRESENTATION

In his presentation, Prof. Dr. Raymond Boyle will focus on the relationship between Sport, Media and Digitalization.

Abstract

This presentation examines how the communication industries in the digital age have continued to interact with sports and in particular examines how this has changed and reconstituted the relationship with spectators, fans and media consumers and citizens.

It argues that mediated sport has been at the forefront of changes in the converging media content industries ranging from issues of access to national events to the rise in value of specific sports content across new platforms forging new relationships with the mobile, always on audience for sports.

The drivers of technological innovation and communications restructuring has resulted in media sport often being centre stage in wider debates around regulation, media rights, citizenship and changing patterns of media consumption. The media sport relationship was established in the pre-broadcast era, and then transformed by radio and then television in the analogue age of spectrum scarcity.

The more recent digital environment opens a new chapter in the on going relationship between sports and the communication industries, a chapter characterised by elements of radical change, but also aspects of continuity. To what extent is the digital environment altering various aspects of the sports media relationship, and what are the implications of this for sports organisations, governing bodies of sport, media companies and sports fans?

Dr. Ansgar Bredenfeld

Dr. Ansgar Bredenfeld

Since 1997 Dr. Bredenfeld has been involved in robotic competitions mainly in RoboCup. In the beginning with an own robotics team and in the year from 2001 to 2007 in a German Coordinated research action of DFG on RoboCup (SPP-1125). In the context of this program, the RoboCup German Open was started in 2001.

Dr. Bredenfeld was co-coordinator of the RoboCup German Open since 2001, up to 2010 as head of a research group at Fraunhofer IAIS. In 2010, he started a SME in Magdeburg focusing on robot competitions and educational robotics projects for various customers. He was associated chair of the RoboCup world championship 2016 and consultant of Leipziger Messe.

 

PRESENTATION

In his presentation, Dr. Ansgar Bredenfeld will  talk about “The RoboCup German Open Competition Series”.

ABSTRACT

RoboCup is a prominent competition for intelligent robots, and one of the world’s key technology events for universities and research institutes. RoboCup offers an interdisciplinary research task covering broad areas of artificial intelligence and robotics. Such areas include: real-time sensor fusion, reactive behavior, strategy acquisition, learning, real-time planning, multi-agent systems, context recognition, computer vision, strategic decision-making, motor control, intelligent robot control, and many more.

The landmark vision of RoboCup to play and win with autonomous robots against humans by the year 2050 is used to guide roadmap development for research and development in all of these scientific disciplines. Competitions are the means to fasten, to compare and to share the state of the art developed by the research teams. The strategy of RoboCup is to already motivate young people to discover this interesting field for their personal development. The focus of RoboCup Junior is not only on technical knowledge and competence development but especially on team work and participation in an international community.

Since 1997 the international RoboCup Federation organizes as central competition the RoboCup world championship each year in summer. Besides the yearly RoboCup world championship regional RoboCup committees are free to organize local open competitions focused on their regional community. These competitions are open to international research teams and usually used by the teams to test the yearly changing league rules and prepare for the world championship. The RoboCup German Open is the best established RoboCup Open event which was held for the first time in 2001.

The RoboCup German Open follows the RoboCup strategy now for 16 years. In the beginning, only soccer-playing robots were presented but the spectrum of leagues was broadened over the years to also target application-oriented topics in robotics. The competition is open to two sort of teams – international RoboCup Major League teams and national RoboCup Junior teams. Today Major leagues comprise different kinds of soccer robots, rescue robots, service robots and industrial robots. In the Junior leagues we have soccer playing robots, rescue robots and a performance competition called OnStage. RoboCup Junior is targeted to girls and boys in school age.

Major and Junior leagues have their own competition format. A German RoboCup Junior team has to qualify for a participation at the RoboCup Junior final on the RoboCup German Open in one of actual six regional tournaments. In a year with a world championship in Germany, i. e. RoboCup 2006 in Bremen and RoboCup 2016 in Leipzig, the event only hosted the final of the German RoboCup Junior competition in order to avoid that Major teams have to travel to the same country twice a year.

The presentation will give an overview of the RoboCup German Open since 2001. We look at the development of the Major Leagues with their international research teams and at the Junior League community with its continuous growth over the years. In addition, we cover topics like the competition location, competition organization and financing as well as the development of co-located exhibitions in the last years.

Prof. Dr. Markus Breuer

Prof. Dr. Markus Breuer

Prof. Dr. Markus Breuer studied business administration, economics and international tax law in Braunschweig, Chemnitz and Hamburg.

Since 2014 he is a professor at SRH University Heidelberg and academic program director of the master program in sport management. His current publications cover questions of manipulation in professional sport and the development of esport in Europe.

Examples of research publications:

Breuer, Markus; Kaiser, Sebastian (2017): Match Fixing and Manipulation in Sport, in: Schulenkorf, Nico; Frawley, Stephen (Hrsg.): Critical Issues in Global Sport Management, London/New York, S. 64–76.

Breuer, Markus; Daumann, Frank (2017): 25 Jahre Deutsche Einheit im Profifußball – eine indikative sportökonomische Untersuchung des gesamtdeutschen Profifußballs seit 1990, in: Hovemann, Gregor; Lammert, Joachim (Hrsg.): Sport im Spannungsfeld unterschiedlicher Sektoren, Schorndorf, S. 27– 42.

Hahn, Alexander; Breuer, Markus; Kaiser, Sebastian (2017): The Use of Online Platforms in the Fight against Black Market Sales of Football Tickets – Empirical Evidence from Germany, in: Becker, Timo; Schneckenleitner, Peter; Reitberger, Wolfgang; Brunner-Sperdin, Alexandra (Hrsg.): Conference Proceedings Trends in Business Communication 2016, Wiesbaden, S. 11–20.

Daumann, Frank; Barth, Michael; Breuer, Markus (2017): Erfolg im Sport planen. Methoden und Prozesse der Planung im Sport, Konstanz/München.

Kaiser, Sebastian; Breuer, Markus (2016): Defining sports marketing, in: Chadwick, Simon; Chanavat, Nicolas; Desbordes, Michel (Hrsg.): Routledge Handbook of Sport Marketing, Oxon/New York, S. 3–12.

Breuer, Markus; Daumann, Frank (2016): Manipulation im Sport, in: Deutscher, Christian; Hovemann, Gregor; Pawlowski, Tim; Thieme, Lutz (Hrsg.): Handbuch Sportökonomik, Schorndorf, S. 197–215.

Presentations at workshops and congresses in the past:

International Congress Sciences and Football – Image, Multimedia & New Technologies, Valenciennes/France, March 1-4, 2016, Topic: The Use of Online Platforms in the Fight against Black Market Sale of Football Tickets – Empirical Evidence from Germany.

24th EASM Conference, Warsaw/Poland, September 7–10, 2016, Topic: Professional Careers in the Sports Management Labor Market – Empirical Results from the German Bundesliga.

The II International Scientific Conference “The State and the Economy – Contemporary Challenges”, Zielona Gora/Poland, December 1–2, 2016, Topic: Public Promotion of Sport – Pros and Cons from an Economic Perspective.

13th International Conference of the Western Economic Association, Santiago de Chile/Chile, January 3-6, 2017, Topic: The Impact of the Coach and the Team Selection on the Performance of Football National Teams – Empirical Evidence from FIFA World Cups 1994 to 2014.

21. Jahrestag des Arbeitskreises Sportökonomie, June 30 July 1, 2017, Düsseldorf/Germany, Topic: Fußballclubs im Spannungsfeld zwischen gesellschaftlicher Verantwortung und fortschreitender Internationalisierung.

 

PRESENTATION

In his presentation, Prof. Dr. Markus Breuer will focus on „E-Sport – Role Model for Traditional Sports or Just another Hype?“.

Abstract:

In line with Müller-Lietzkow (2006) E-Sport can be defined as the competitive use of computer and video games. Since its roots in the 1990s E-Sport has developed to a multi-million dollar business: Newzoo (2015) estimated a global market volume of nearly 200 m. US-Dollar in 2014. Deloitte (2016) predicts revenues of 130 m. US-Dollar in Germany in 2020. Schmidt/Gottschlich/Bünning (2016) even stated that the trophy money of the DotA 2 championship is in the same range as the trophy money of the NFL Superbowl. Despite this impressive figures and forecasts E-Sports still implies significant economic risks for organizers/suppliers: In early 2017 a new games fair, Arcade One in Dortmund, needed to be cancelled due to too little demand.

From its beginning on E-Sports developed its own structures and did not entirely follow the standard model of European or US-American professional sports (Breuer, 2012). Differences can mainly be found in i) structures and ii) marketing:

i) Global E-Sports is dominated by for profit organizations; NPOs like German membership corporations or multinational associations do not play an important role.

ii) Digital media are an essential part of global E-Sport and, thus, marketing is less based on TV but focuses on the internet. Players build up channels, use online media to communicate with fans and develop new ways to collect revenues.

Next years might be a crucial period for E-Sports. If past growth rates remain stable or can even be outperformed electronic sports (and its structures) might become a role model for traditional sports. But even if forecasts are not fulfilled E-Sports will probably go on being successful in its niche market.

Sven Busch

Sven Busch

After a stint as a US correspondent for the international news agency dpa Sven Busch became  editor-in-chief for Eurosport in Paris.

The German native then switched to being a presenter and commentator for Eurosport and Premiere before accepting an offer as head of sports for dpa. He currently works as duty editor for the Olympic Channel.

 

PRESENTATION

His presentation is titled „The Olympic Channel…because 17 days is not enough“.

Abstract

Where the Games never end! The Olympic Channel is a digital-first, multi-platform global media destination where you can experience the power of sport and connect with the Olympic Movement all year round. Anytime, anywhere, and on any device.

Dr. Galen Clavio

Dr. Galen Clavio

Dr. Galen Clavio, Ph.D., is the Director of the National Sports Journalism Center at Indiana University, where he heads the Sports Media program.

Clavio has recently partnered with Indiana University’s Cuban Center for Sports Media and Technology to research the implications of advanced sports media technology, including Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality, on sports media perception and consumption trends among audiences. He has authored over 40 peer-reviewed articles on the impact of new and social media on the relationship between sports, media, and fans.

Examples of research publications:

Frederick, E.L. & Clavio, G. (2015): Blurred Lines: A qualitative analysis of Twitter use among elite high school athletes. International Journal of Sport Communication, 8, 330-344.

Lee, M., Ryu, S., Lovell, D., Clavio, G., Lovell, M.D. & Pedersen, P.M. (2015): The effect of Twitter on sports fans’ information processing: An analysis of the controversial referee’s decision in the 2012 London Olympic Games. International Journal of Sport Management and Marketing, 15(3/4), 102-119.

Kian, E.M., Schultz, B., Clavio, G., & Sheffer, M.A. (2015): Sports Multimedia Journalism: A practitioner’s guide for the digital age. Proposal accepted by Oxford University Press, December 2015.

 

PRESENTATION

His presentation is titled „Sports Events 4.0 – The Virtual Reality of Sports“.

Abstract

Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality have grown from futuristic fantasy to present-day fascination in the past few years. The advent of faster internet and faster computer processing power have allowed technology companies to redefine the envelope of consumer experience. In this new world of virtual and augmented reality, sports organizations, media partners, and event organizers find themselves at a crossroads that is both daunting and exciting.

For the past several decades, the consumer sport experience has been separated into two separate yet equally important areas: the in-person experience and the televised viewing experience. Each of those areas presents its own strengths and weaknesses in the consumption of sporting events. The dream of virtual reality in sports is to combine the best of those experiences. The technology has shown a capability of harnessing the mind and the spirit, using a headset to place a fan in an environment that they might never be able to experience in person. To that end, media companies have partnered with sports entities to bring virtual reality broadcasts of sporting events into people’s homes. The NFL, NBA, and NCAA American football have all utilized virtual reality broadcasts to provide audiences with unprecedented viewing experiences of major events.

Organizations have also adopted virtual reality to revolutionize the process of training athletes. By having athletes practice plays and read opposition tendencies in a virtualized environment, unnecessary wear-and-tear in physical practices is reduced, saving athletes from injuries and fatigue and allowing on-field decision makers to visualize defenses in a more realistic environment.

The potential of the technologies has captured the dreams of sports executives across the world.  There are many industry challenges to the implementation of virtual reality, but just as many opportunities for growth. This presentation explores both, and discusses the present and future of these technologies in sport.

Henning Eberhardt

Henning Eberhardt

Henning Eberhardt (30) studied science of sport and media at the University of Hamburg. After his Bachelor degree he worked as feelancer and volunteer in several editorial departments.

Since 2013 Eberhardt is a responsible part of the editorial staff from the SPONSORs Verlags GmbH in Hamburg. SPONSORs has successfully been active in the sports business industry for over 20 years now. With its SPONSORs (“content”), SPOBIS (“live”) and SPOAC (“education”) brands, it is a major player in the field of information provision. With 300 speakers and 3,000 participants, the SPOBIS event series (SPONSORs Business Summits) is a market leader in Europe.

 

PRESENTATION

He would like to talk about „Should football clubs invest in eSports now or is it an overrated hype?“.

Abstract

BVB Chairman Hans-Joachim Watzke gave only a curt response when asked about his personal opinion of eSports at Borussia’s AGM in November 2016: “It’s complete shit. Experience has shown that it is well worth not doing everything that FC Schalke 04 does.“ And so the headline was born. No time remained for any explanation or even to address the subject in any greater depth.

In contrast, FC Schalke 04 publicly advocates eSports and, in the past two years, has even set up its own eSports division. This is unprecedented in the Bundesliga. The ‘Royal Blues’ are not only investing in PES and FIFA players, but now also has its very own League of Legends team. For FC Schalke 04, eSports are therefore clearly far more than just an innovative experiment. The club wishes to use eSports to reach younger target groups as well as to access the Asian market and tap into new partner potential. “Worldwide, 1.7 billion people play eSports and many hundreds of millions of these players are in Asia,” says S04’s Board Member for Marketing, Alexander Jobst.

As the third Bundesliga club, VfB Stuttgart recently launched an eSports team after VfL Wolfsburg and FC Schalke 04. Should other football clubs act now or is eSports an overrated hype?

Andre Fläckel

Andre Fläckel

André Fläckel, born in 1989, has been in touch with eSports at Lagardere Sports since June 2016. His work focusses on brokering partnerships, building sponsorship inventory and planning campaigns. Working together with the six-person eSports team, he is responsible for market entry and the expansion of the eSports business area for Lagardère Sports.

Mr. Fläckel studied marketing management at the Bielefeld University of Applied Sciences for SMEs and has been at Lagardère Sports since October 2013. He started his career in the sports marketing agency’s digital unit, where he was primarily involved in setting up the digital business for rights holders in football and worked on projects for teams like Borussia Dortmund, Hertha BSC, and Eintracht Frankfurt as well as for CAF, the Confederation of African Football. In addition to marketing for social media activities he was also responsible for club websites and mobile apps.

 

PRESENTATION

Andre Fläckel will talk about “eSport as economic factor”.

Abstract

Whether you’ve noticed it or not, gaming is deeply ingrained in pop culture today.  Not a day goes by on without new headlines and clichés for and against Gaming and its professional area of sports, eSports. eSports is going to get mainstream – so much so that, according to gaming trends analyst Newzoo, it’s one of the most-watched content categories on the internet today.

This presents a big opportunity for brands, game-related or not. Gamers are a highly engaged and influential audience. It’s a young, intelligent and digital driven target group that can’t be reached via TV anymore. But what does it all mean to you? In our talk, we wish to provide you with some answers – not by merely repeating the same biased opinions and presenting dull theory, but rather with concrete facts, ideas and approaches on how to approach eSports from your point of view.

Topics covered:

  • How does the eSports business work?
  • Why should I invest in eSports?
  • Who are the eSports fans and what do they want?
  • How do I reach this target group?
  • What time frames and prices can I expect in eSports sponsoring?
Rebecca Gebler-Branch

Rebecca Gebler-Branch

Rebecca Gebler-Branch works as the head of Marketing at Ghostthinker, a Hamburg based EdTech Company who is well known as an expert for digital education processes in sports organizations.

After studying Communication and Social Science in Switzerland, Rebecca received her MBA degree with focus on Event-Marketing. She than worked in international and national organizations in the fields of Arts and Culture organizing international exhibitions and arts festivals as well as in industrial orientated organizations.

Coming from a creative influenced background she joined Ghostthinker in 2014 with the mission to build up Ghostthinkers main brand edubreak®, a special online-video-learning platform for digital education programs.

Over the last three years, she has worked on a customer relationship program, that is build upon the idea of mixing creative and rather for sports unconventional marketing elements with educational ones.

PRESENTATION

Rebecca Gebler-Branch is talking about: „Blend it! and turn your event program into one that your participants are actually interested in!“

Abstract

Interaction, inspiration and information – these are the three main pillars the “Blended Conference” event-format is built on. This format is the result of dissatisfaction towards traditional event and workshop formats within our team.

Most of the time the programs of conventional formats are based on a small group of people who decide amongst them what topics should be on the agenda. Furthermore, conventional formats consume a huge amount of time to actually get everyone thematically on board in the beginning. And at the end of the day, they are just finished. But what happens afterwards? Usually, there is no follow up discussion at all.

Our definition of a contemporary and valuable event-format for customers includes creative and valuable involvement of all participants, relevant inspiration and practical information. Additionally, a constant social exchange, discussions between all participants (including ourselves) regarding ideas and the agenda as well as news are mandatory. This exchange starts way before the actual event and has basically no finish.

“Contemporary” for us means to profit from the advantages of digital media. As a company that helps sports organizations in implementing digital media into their education processes we are well-versed with the teaching and learning format “Blended Learning”. We decided to allocate this idea onto our own customer events and this is how the idea of a “Blended Conference” was born.

How we realize that idea and how our customers respond to it will be part of my presentation.

Prof. Dr. Andreas Hebbel-Seeger

Prof. Dr. Andreas Hebbel-Seeger

Prof. Dr. Andreas Hebbel-Seeger is a Professor of Media Management at Macromedia University of Applied Sciences and Head of Media School at Campus Hamburg, Germany.

His interests range from photography to technology. He is also interested in education, sports and marketing.

Currently he is involved in an EU-founded project which is investigating on the use of digital games for learning purposes. Furthermore he is working in several research projects on the use of video drones, 360-degree video and VR devices regarding to learning, training and communication in sports.

 

PRESENTATION

In a joint presentation together with Prof. Dr. Thomas Horky, he will focus on the use of drone technologies. The  presentation is titled „Drones in academic apprenticeship. Regarding to expectations and consequences for a up-to-date education in sports journalism and media management“.

Abstract

Video drones not only offer new perspectives but also an extension of the ways in which stories can be told in sports and event communication can be operated. On the one hand perceptual psychological mechanisms, which are already well-known from the production of films (such as, for example, the power and overview suggestive from the top to bottom view), have an effect. On the other hand, the view from the top of a sports event also provides new information that can not be generated otherwise and whose use significantly changes the staging of sports, sports reporting and sports training.

On selected examples from different sports we show that the exploitation of surplus values ​​in the sense mentioned above does not only depend on the increased camera position. Rather it is crucial to capture and understand the domain-specific peculiarities of a sport in order to profitably exploit the freedom degrees of a drone deployment, taking into account the respective profile of requirements and the intended communication target. It is a question of whether a sporting event should unfold below a drone hovering on a fixed position or the drone should follow an athlete or an overall situation. It depends on the extent and distance of the drone deployment, whether and in which angle a movement path is crossed or an event is encircled, etc.

An up-to-date education in media management as well as in sports journalism must not only enable students to tap and understand the profile of requirements in sports and their concretization in the competition but also to take into account the possibilities of communication extended with the use of video drones as well as for spectators, for a live audience and for media-mediated communication. In doing so, aesthetic, journalistic and economic aspects must be taken into account as well as data- and security-legal concerns and psychological effects.

Prof. Dr. José María Herranz de la Casa

Prof. Dr. José María Herranz de la Casa

Prof. Dr. Herranz de la Casa does have a PhD in Journalism from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid. He has worked in the sports journal MARCA and in the Catholic University of Avila and the Universidad Miguel de Cervantes. In addition to being a teacher, he has been responsible for communication at both universities.

Actually he is working as a professor of the University of Castilla-La Mancha in the Faculty of Journalism of Cuenca. His scientific research work focuses on communication and transparency in NGOs, business and organizational communication, social responsibility and innovation and specialized journalism (Sport and Environment). His special interest belongs to communication in virtual reality, immersive journalism and 360 video called “Encuentra en Cuenca”.

Find examples of his research publications and presentations at workshops and congresses in the past on Research Gata and ORCID.

 

PRESENTATION

Dr. Herranz de la Casa is talking about “Virtual reality and 360º video in a local medium: a case study of El Deporte Conquense in Spain”.

Abstract

Traditional media are constantly evolving thanks to the Internet and all kinds of digital tools. Virtual reality, an innovation that is rapidly increasing its penetration among professionals, could soon become a successful new journalistic narrative. This technology offers the user the possibility of positioning himself as the first person of the action, in the place where the events take place, without being there. And if these contents are consumed through a VR glasses, the immersive sensation is complete.

In this panel we present the first results of a research project about the use of virtual reality and 360º videos in the field of sports journalism in local media. The case study of El Deporte Conquense, a local sports news website in the city of Cuenca (Spain),  offers a chance to reflect on the possibilities, strengths and weaknesses of virtual reality and 360 in local media.

At a local level, the opportunities are enormous because this technology establishes a greater empathic connection with its audience. However, are local audiences really prepared to consume this kind of contents in Spain? Have 360 videos more engagement potential than other news stories published by the same medium? There are some media outlets like Fox Sports or corporations like NextVR that are working and testing in this area, but what about local news? Our research team (@EncEnCuenca) has produced some features in 360 video about sports like fencing, handball, golf, canoeing or volleyball for the past six months and has studied their reach and engagement in the website and in social media. In the next future, a qualitative analysis will ask local media consumers about their experiences with 360 video and VR glasses.

Prof. Dr. Thomas Horky

Prof. Dr. Thomas Horky

Prof. Dr. Thomas Horky, born 1965, is a Professor for Sports Journalism at the Macromedia University of Applied Sciences in Hamburg. After studying sports science, journalism and linguistics he worked as a trainee journalist for the German press agency dpa and as a freelance journalist for several media.

He was research assistant at the Department of Sports Science at the University of Hamburg and the Hamburg Institute of Sports Journalism as well as a lecturer at the Institute of Sports Journalism at the German Sports University in Cologne.

Since 2009 he is working for the Macromedia University of Applied Sciences in Hamburg. The Head of Media School and Head of Research is member of the editorial board of some international journals (Communication & Sport, International Journal of Sport Communication, Global Sport Business Journal, Modern Sport Communication).

His main research projects are quality of journalism (international comparison), mediasport and staging and sports journalism and entertainment. He wrote several international contributions concerning sports and media, some books and is editor of the German book-series „Sportkommunikation” and „Sport & Kommunikation”.

 

PRESENTATION

In a joint presentation together with Prof. Dr. Andreas Hebbel-Seeger, he will focus on the use of drone technologies. The  presentation is titled „Drones in academic apprenticeship. Regarding to expectations and consequences for a up-to-date education in sports journalism and media management“.

Abstract

Video drones not only offer new perspectives but also an extension of the ways in which stories can be told in sports and event communication can be operated. On the one hand perceptual psychological mechanisms, which are already well-known from the production of films (such as, for example, the power and overview suggestive from the top to bottom view), have an effect. On the other hand, the view from the top of a sports event also provides new information that can not be generated otherwise and whose use significantly changes the staging of sports, sports reporting and sports training.

On selected examples from different sports we show that the exploitation of surplus values ​​in the sense mentioned above does not only depend on the increased camera position. Rather it is crucial to capture and understand the domain-specific peculiarities of a sport in order to profitably exploit the freedom degrees of a drone deployment, taking into account the respective profile of requirements and the intended communication target. It is a question of whether a sporting event should unfold below a drone hovering on a fixed position or the drone should follow an athlete or an overall situation. It depends on the extent and distance of the drone deployment, whether and in which angle a movement path is crossed or an event is encircled, etc.

An up-to-date education in media management as well as in sports journalism must not only enable students to tap and understand the profile of requirements in sports and their concretization in the competition but also to take into account the possibilities of communication extended with the use of video drones as well as for spectators, for a live audience and for media-mediated communication. In doing so, aesthetic, journalistic and economic aspects must be taken into account as well as data- and security-legal concerns and psychological effects.

Prof. Dr. Christoph Igel

Prof. Dr. Christoph Igel

Prof. Dr. Christoph Igel is the Principal Researcher and Scientific Director of the Educational Technology Lab at the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI) in Berlin. He has been a Visiting Professor at the Continuing Education School in Shanghai Jiao Tong University (China) since 2011, and since 2015 has held the post of Professor of Educational Technology in the Faculty of Computer Science at TU Chemnitz.

To date, Professor Igel has presided over more than 100 national and international research, development, innovation and consultation projects on technology-based training and qualification in business, education, science and administration. He advices DAX companies on staff development issues in the era of digitisation, the internet of things and industry 4.0 and is an expert reviewer for funding programmes run by institutions such as the German Federal Ministries of Economics and Technology and Education and Research and the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Industry.

Since 2013 Professor Igel has been the chair of the ‘Intelligent Education Networks’ expert group as part of the federal government’s national Digital Summit, and was in the same year appointed co-chair of the ‘Technology-Enhanced Teaching and Learning in Medicine’ working group for the German Society of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology and the German Society for Computer Science. Since 2017 he has been an ambassador for the National MINT Forum and has been committed to education in the fields of mathematics, computing, science and technology.

 

PRESENTATION

The presentation of Prof. Dr. Christoph Igel is titled: “From learning to doing. Can artificial intelligence and the internet of things improve education?”.

Abstract

Artificial Intelligence (AI) enables learning environments that adapt themselves to the individual learner to provide on-the-spot context-dependent assistance and long-term knowledge acquisition support. Systems powered by machine learning methods can predict probable learning successes and failures. Today, however, such systems are mostly applied in digital learning environments as it is difficult to transfer the methods to the analogue, physical world. There, the ongoing digitalization enabled by the Internet of Things (IoT) will open up significant new opportunities for AI-based learning. Studies say that 2020 will see 20 billion connected devices – devices that gather information about the world through sensors, interact with their environment through actors, and are connected through the IoT. In their presentation, Prof. Dr. Igel and Dr. Ullrich will give examples of AI-based learning environments and illustrate the potential of the IoT for education.

Paul Keuter

Paul Keuter

Paul Keuter, was born in October 1974 in Hamburg and is married to Cristina Keuter (American). They do have two children.

Since January 2016 Paul Keuter is a member of the Executive Board of Hertha BSC, responsible for Brand, Communication & Digital Transformation.

Paul joined Hertha BSC previously being Twitter’s Head of Sports (Global Sports Chair) for 3 years. In the past, he has been working as a players agent, amongst others solely being responsible for 82times national player Arne Friedrich.

Paul is also looking back on a longer path within the TV Industry, where he has been working as Editor and Producer (ITV Studios) before taking on the role of Director Marketing and Business Devolpment of a TV Production Company.

Paul has been a contractual football player himself, who made it up to the 3rd German division and further considers himself a connoisseur of Soul music.
https://www.linkedin.com/in/paul-keuter-7625a754/

 

PRESENTATION

His presentation is titled, „Brand Strategy & Digital Transformation of Hertha BSC“

Abstract

Digital transformation of a company is basically very extensive. Paul Keuter will give an insight into the digital way by means of the repositioning of the Hertha BSC brand, focusing on cultural and management change.

At the German capital City 1. League Club „Hertha BSC“ the transformation is seen as a holistic process and goes far beyond social media and online architecture.

Article in german on that process

Dr. Elsa Kirchner

Dr. Elsa Kirchner

Dr. Elsa A. Kirchner born in 1976, studied from 1994 to 1999 Biology at the University of Bremen, Germany. In 1999 she received her Diploma (Dipl. Biol.). Her diploma thesis was the result of a cooperation between the Brain Research Institute I: Behavioral Physiology and Developmental Neurobiology of the University of Bremen and the department of Epileptology at the University Hospital of Bonn, Germany.

From 1997 to 2000 she was fellow of the Studienstiftung des Deutschen Volkes. During her studies she received several other scholar ships. With the help of the Stiftung Familie Klee award she was able to work as a guest researcher at the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT in Boston, USA, from 1999 to 2000. Since 2005, she is staff scientist of the Robotics Lab at the University of Bremen, Germany, leading the Brain & Behavioral Labs. Since 2008, she leads the team Interaction and since 2016 the extended team Sustained Interaction and Learning, at the Robotics Innovation Center of the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI GmbH) in Bremen, Germany. In 2014 she graduated (Dr. rer. nat) in Computer Science at the University of Bremen.

Her scientific interests focus on human-machine interaction, cognitive architectures, neuropsychology, and electrophysiological methods. She supervised several Diploma, B.Sc. and M.Sc. students and served as reviewer of international journals and conferences. She also is author of more than 60 publications in peer-reviewed international journals and of three book chapters.

 

PRESENTATION

The presentation of Dr. Elsa Kirchner is titeld: „Intuitive Interfacing in Robotics and Assistive Devices by Embedded Brain Reading“.

Abstract

Future robotic systems require advanced interaction approaches and devices that make a robot more human like in its appearance and interaction or to enable a system to almost read the intention of a user as it is the case for rehabilitation robotics. A better insight and understanding into a person is needed and can be provided by future embedded multimodal interfaces. The talk will report on the relevance and requirements on design and function of such interfaces in robotics, to enable not only intuitive but also inherently save human-robot interaction. A basis requirement is that they must be able to decipher the human’s intention and to infer on her or his upcoming interaction behavior. A person’s behavior is observable from the outside and can be used for active input to a robot. Alternatively, naturally occurring behavior can passively be monitored and interpreted by the interface as an input. Such overt behavior is sensitive to individual, cultural and societal factors. The interpretation of an individual’s behavior might not be transferable for another person. This is especially true for passively observed naturally occurring behavior. Here, the usage of covered psychophysiological data has shown to be a better option. Therefore, interfaces should not only combine active and passive input modes, but make use of overt and covered data of the human to allow reliable interpretation of the human’s intention.

To enable inherent safety, that is required since human will in the future interact more and more closer with humans and will even physically cooperate, interfaces must be developed that are deeply embedded into the control of the robotic system. Examples will be given for different applications, ranching from teleoperation or human-robot cooperation to rehabilitation robotics and assistive devices.

Prof. Dr. Frank Kirchner

Prof. Dr. Frank Kirchner

Prof. Dr. Frank Kirchner studied computer science and neurobiology at the University Bonn (Germany) where he received the Dr. rer. nat. degree in computer science in 1999. Since 1994, he has been a Senior Scientist at the “Gesellschaft für Mathematik und Datenverarbeitung” (GMD) in Sankt Augustin (Germany) and also a Senior Scientist at the Department for Electrical Engineering from 1998 at Northeastern University in Boston (MA, USA). In 1999, he first was appointed Tenure Track Assistant Professor at the Northeastern University and since 2002 as a Full Professor at the University of Bremen (Germany).

Since December 2005, he has also been the CEO of the Robotics Innovation Center, speaker of the Bremen location of the German Centre for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI) and since 2013 Scientific Director of the Brazilian Institute of Robotics (BIR).

Frank Kirchner is a leading expert in research on biologically inspired locomotion and behaviour of highly redundant, multifunctional robotic systems. For a number of PhD students he is the principal supervisor and he regularly serves as a reviewer for a series of international scientific journals and conferences. Frank Kirchner also is author of more than 200 publications in the field of Robotics and Artificial Intelligence.

 

PRESENTATION

In his presentation, Prof. Dr. Frank Kirchner will focus on Robotics and Artificial Intelligence.

ABSTRACT

In recent years robotics has gained a lot of interest also in the area of artificial intelligence. While systems for a long time have been used as tools to implement classical AI approaches in the area of object recognition, environment representation, path and motion planning etc..

Researchers now begin to understand that the system (robot) itself is part of the question and has to be taken into account when teaching AI questions.

This talk might survey the state of the art in robotics and outline ways to tackle the question of AI in the light of the systems as an integral part of the approach. Future milestones and key achievements will be discussed to show a perspective on how humans and robots can collaborate as a team.

J. Peter Lemcke

J. Peter Lemcke

Peter Lemcke founded and initialized the “German Games Schoolmasterchip” (DGS). This is a eSport-Competition for students throughout Germany. He is also the managing director of the company that organizes the competition.

Lemcke is active as chief editor for the Polygram group as well as director at the theater, on television and film. He is the founder of the German Games Museum in Chemnitz (Saxony). Moreover he works as lecturer and games author.

 

PRESENTATION

His presentation is titled „eSports should be played in school“  –  the “eSchool“ project by DGS“.

Abstract

eSports are rapidly gaining in importance: this is where the globally connected free world is coming together to play. As opposed to the situation in Sweden, the United States and Asia, there is still a fierce debate going on in Germany about whether and when to recognise it as a sport and when it will receive non-profit status. We go one step further and demand that eSports will become a part of the school curriculum.

It is uncontested that in our everyday reality we all benefit from the interaction with games and sports. Because the gaming reality makes current areas of conflict open for “paradoxical interventions“ – for actions from a new and unexpected perspective. Above all, it stimulates informal learning processes, allowing people to evaluate themselves and their environment better and to gain emotional stability. Even simulations of violence, as critically as they are observed, can have positive effects on the players. These sports competitions foster the idea of fair play and help making players fit for living together in a peaceful, heterogeneous and multipolar society. Nowadays the interesting areas of conflict appear in global digital networks. Consequently, challenges like eSports are important to stimulate informal learning processes.

The “eSchool project“ takes the value-generating potential of sports into schools. Because future competitiveness as a multiplayer in digital societies is based on education and sportsmanship. But the setting of digital online games also includes the risk of losing the interaction with reality. First, biophysical motivational factors have a particularly strong effect –  and second, the fascination is often viewed with suspicion by the familiar environment of family and school. Integrating eSports into daily school life should thus also prevent teenagers from becoming isolated in a phase of particular emotional instability. That way, interfaces for communication remain active, increasing the possibility to transfer the acquired skills to successful actions in everyday real life.

As the initiator, DGS advocates for a better understanding of eSports throughout society and to make it independent from commercial intentions. Peter Lemcke and Dr Ina Weh will give a dialogue lecture about the basic idea of “eSchool“, its operative aspects, the scientific background and perspective.

Mario Leo

Mario Leo

All my life Sports played a major role. Being very active on the pitch in the beginning, after a crucial ligament injury more in coaching and supporting roles. I enable my career through the passion of sports.

Communications Engineering Degree, with a focus on satellite and mobile communications I experienced life in Germany, the United Kingdom, U.S.A., Australia, Malaysia and returned back to Germany in 2004.

Working in Mobile Value Added Services Space until 2006, followed by a spell in the educational industry from 2006 to 2008 until founding RESULT. Initially a Consulting Company, but from 2010 the platform “RESULT Sports” with its sole dedication to the evolution and services of Digital Media in Sports. Publisher of magazine “Digital Sports Media” and host of “Digital Sports & Entertainment” Conference annually held in Berlin. Speaker at events, conferences and author of Course Books for Digital Media in Sports.

 

PRESENTATION

In his presentation, Mario Leo will talk about „Digital evolution, digital communities, eSports in sports organizations“.

Abstract

Digital Media in Sports has seen an ever increasing importance in sports organizations. As distribution channel for news updates, community building, internationalization and subsequently with digital marketing activities a revenue generator. Therefore entering eSports is an organic evolution to enable new target audiences. Mario Leo will share the evolution, status quo and provides a global overview of digital media in sports.

Dr. Hans-Arthur Marsiske

Dr. Hans-Arthur Marsiske

Dr. Hans-Arthur Marsiske, born 1955, studied Sociology at the University of Hamburg and earned his PhD in Social and Economic History for his research on Wilhelm Weitling, the first proponent of communism in Germany. He published several scientific books and articles on 19th century social movements as well as on the relevance of film and audiovisual media in historical research, before turning to journalism.

Since 1990 he works as a freelance writer, covering film as well as science and technology, mainly space research, robotics, and artificial intelligence. He is following RoboCup from the very beginning of the initiative in 1997, has visited a lot of other robot competitions since then, and wonders why he still seems to be the only reporter worldwide who uses this invaluable resource of information on the state of the art of robotics.

Examples of research publications:

Marsiske, Hans-Arthur (2012): Kriegsmaschinen. Roboter im Militäreinsatz, Hannover.

Marsiske, Hans-Arthur (2005): Heimat Weltall. Wohin soll die Raumfahrt führen? Berlin.

Marsiske, Hans-Arthur / Burkhard, Hans-Dieter (2003): Endspiel 2050. Wie Roboter Fußball spielen lernen, Hannover.

Marsiske, Hans-Arthur (1992): Zeitmaschine Kino. Darstellungen von Geschichte im Film, Marburg.

 

PRESENTATION

The presentation of Dr. Marsiske is titled: “RoboCup – It’s History, Future Prospects and Societal Relevance from a Spectator’s Perspective”.

Abstract

Since 1997 RoboCup offers the unique opportunity to learn about artificial intelligence and robotics and follow the development of these technologies in real-time by simply watching the action on the playing fields and arenas. During these 20 years the landscape of robotics has changed dramatically, while RoboCup still remains the most important robot competition allowing not only outstanding insights into the state-of-the-art of technology but at the same time offering a forum to reflect upon its societal and cultural aspects as well.

I’d like to present you the history of RoboCup from my personal perspective as a news reporter, trying to argue why robot competitions in general and RoboCup especially are an extremely important institution to prepare our societies for the rise of the robots.

Dr. Ann Pegoraro

Dr. Ann Pegoraro

Dr. Ann Pegoraro is an Associate Professor and the Director of the Institute for Sport Marketing at Laurentian University. She is also the Vice-Chair of the International Association for the Communication of Sport (IACS).

Dr. Pegoraro is an active researcher, who has presented at international conferences and published in referred  journals in the areas of marketing, communication, digital media and sport management. Her research focuses on the intersection of sport and new media, particularly social media.

 

PRESENTATION

In her presentation she will be focused on the relation between sport, technology and new media.

Abstract

In the realm of sport, scholars have identified the rise of digital media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook as disruptive communication in sport (Pegoraro, 2014) while also arguing that this disruption provides an innovative new avenue to develop relationships between fans and sporting entities including teams and athletes (Kassing and Sanderson 2009). This presentation will cover the author’s trajectory of research into the nexus of sport and digital media including topics such as branding, consumer behavior, fan interaction, fan negotiation of scandals (e.g. murder; corruption) and social issues (e.g. child abuse; gender) related to organizations and athletes. The presentation will highlight how organizations and individuals (sport fans) create content and organic frameworks on digital media platforms.  The results presented provide a rich delve into the world of sport and digital media.

Arne Peters

Arne Peters

Arne Peters was responsible for ESLs global strategic relations as well as technology cooperations. He’s been working in the games and technology industry for most of his life, serving in management positions at companies such as Intel, cdv, Atari and Nintendo.

At Intel Corporation he was responsible for the games and content strategy for the EMEA region, working with studios and publishers on developing games for the latest PC technologies and growing the PC ecosystem. Prior to joining ESL (Turtle Entertainment), Arne Peters was Managing Director at 505 Games and responsible for the German and Eastern European region.

 

PRESENTATION

His presentation is titled: „The sports of the digital generation“

Abstract

While esports may still lacking wide acceptance by many sports traditionalists, it seems to offer everything that the digital generation regards as being „their“ sport and form of entertainment.

What makes esports so different and successful? The talk will discuss the rise of esports – how it got started and where it’s heading. It’ll explain why and how esports will not only survive the current hype, but grow into something even bigger. And it’ll also look into the ever important role of the community and players.

 

Dr. Lauren Reichart Smith

Dr. Lauren Reichart Smith

Dr. Lauren Reichart Smith (Ph.D. 2010) is an assistant professor of sports media.

She previously served as an associate professor and the associate director for public relations at Auburn University. As a former television producer, she worked in both the Atlanta and Birmingham television markets, and received an Emmy nomination in 2005.

She earned her B.A. from Fairfield University, her M.A. from the University of Alabama-Birmingham, and her Ph.D. from the University of Alabama.

Lauren’s main research area lies in mediasport – the intersection between sports and mass media. Her research encapsulates both mass media and social media. This focus has enabled her to complete research that focuses on issues of gender, race, and national identity. She primarily analyzes how athletes are portrayed in the media, as well as how new technologies enhance a fan’s enjoyment of a game.

Lauren is currently the chair of the International Association of Communication and Sport.

Examples of research publications:

Smith, L.R., Smith, K.D., & Blaszka, M. (2016, in press); Follow me, what’s the harm? Considerations of catfishing and utilizing fake online personas on social media. Journal of Legal Aspects of Sport.

Smith, L.R. (2011): The less you say: An exploratory study of gender coverage in sports on Twitter. In A.C. Billings (Ed.). Sports media: Transformation, integration, consumption (pp. 146-161). New York: Routledge.

Smith, L.R., & Smith, K.D. (2010): What a difference a download makes: Political advertising in the digital age. In N. Burns, T. Daugherty, and M.S. Eastin (Eds.). A handbook of research on digital media and advertising: User generated content consumption (pp. 577-603). Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

Presentations at workshops and congresses in the past:

Summit of the International Association for Communication and Sport, Phoenix, AZ, March, 2017, Topic: My story, their Story: A self-presentation comparison of athlete and media Instagram feeds.

 

PRESENTATION

Her presentation is titled „International Association of Communication and Sport organization overview/Research on the virtual reality of sports in the U.S.“.

Abstract

This presentation will focus first on introducing the International Association for Communication and Sport (IACS), the mission and goals of the organization, the current reseach and pedagogy being done within our membership, and the organization’s overall goals for further internationalization. Secondly, Lauren will focus the remainder of her time on an overview of her research on social media, noting past trends, and discussing future avenues of research in social media that include both psychological measures and effects studies.

Timothy Robeers

Timothy Robeers

Timothy Robeers is a PhD student in Communication Sciences as part of the Media, Policy and Culture research group at Antwerp University, Belgium, and is currently working as a BAP member of staff at the same university.

Having previously studied Germanic Languages (BA) and Film & Visual Culture (MA), and building on issues regarding media and sustainability which he encountered during his participation in endurance rallying, he started his PhD in 2013.

For this PhD project, he is particularly looking at the way in which a diverse range of media represent efforts in auto sport to become more environmentally sustainable. As part of his PhD project, he is actively engaged with research projects at the University of Glasgow (UK) where he undertook a visiting graduate research position and at the University of Stirling (UK).

 

PRESENTATION

His presentation is titled: „Communicating Green Motorsport: A Framing Analysis of Environmental Sustainability in Live TV Coverage of Formula E“.

Abstract

In September 2014, Formula E, a fully electric racing series aimed at accelerating general interest in electric vehicles and promoting clean energy and sustainability took place in the Olympic Park in Beijing. This futuristic series targets primarily young urban audiences by bringing motorsport to global city centres and by incorporating environmental sustainability as one of its core values. The latter constitutes a well-known strategy which sporting organizations increasingly adopt to create more socially and environmentally responsible sport and consequently increases media attention such as live sports broadcasting. Due to its liveness it provides a background and frames what the live event is about. A previous study into the representation of environmental sustainability (Robeers & Van den Bulck, 2016) on Formula E’s website found that ES was significantly represented as a core value but, as part of an intended mediatized spectacle, did not manage to escape the claws of commodification. By means of a case study and framing approach, this paper determines how Formula E and Environmental Sustainability are framed in ITV’s live television coverage of the 2014 Beijing season opening EPrix and Channel 5’s live television coverage of 2016 Hong Kong season opening EPrix and as such, this paper forms part of a larger study into the media’s representation of environmental sustainability in contemporary urban motorsport.

Using a mixed methodology, we subjected the transcripts first to a quantitative content analysis followed by a more in-depth qualitative framing analysis using framing devices and reasoning devices to determine frame packages (Gamson & Modigliani, 1989; Entman, 1993) to provide a more profound insight into the portrayal of Formula E and Environmental Sustainability. Although data from both analyses differ in character, they relate to the same topics of Formula E and Environmental Sustainability and consequently complement each other by providing mutual verification.

Research is still ongoing but preliminary results suggest that some level of difference in frames applied in the ITV and Channel 5 live-coverages. The former features the dominant frame ‘link to Formula One’, as well as the frame ‘Green but cool’ which affirms Formula E’s eco credentials as relevant without hindering traditional motor racing values. The latter features the dominant frame of Formula E as ‘here to stay’ as well as a second dominant frame ‘race cars of today – road cars of tomorrow’ in which the sustainability aspect lies inherently embedded. One dominant frame seems to emerge in both broadcasts, namely that of Formula E as a ‘monumental challenge’ which focuses on the sporting aspect that the series provides for participating teams and drivers.

Although more analysis is needed, this could indicate that the ITV broadcast put more emphasis on trying to explain the new series in view of the well-known series of Formula One and in view of confirming the presence of traditional motor racing values to what was effectively a new audience. In the Channel 5 broadcast, audiences have ‘matured’ more to Formula E meaning the ‘green card’ as a selling point needs no explicit referencing as such but is rather subtle included in which clean technologies are created in motorsport and their possible future applications to road cars and public transport. This seemingly indicates that frames used in relation to Environmental Sustainability change depending on audiences but also that Environmental Sustainability remains relevant in framing Formula E on TV after two years. This, as a final result, also indicates the ever importance of the marketing process.

Prof. aso. José Luis Rojas Torrijos

Prof. aso. José Luis Rojas Torrijos

Prof. aso. José Luis Rojas Torrijos is a journalist, a graduate in Journalism and has a PhD in Journalism. He is an adjunct professor of Journalism at Communication School in the University of Seville and at Universitary Campus EUSA.

Besides, he is a member of the teaching staff of seven master degrees in Sports Journalism in Spain (universities Pontificia de Salamanca, Pompeu Fabra from Barcelona, Europea de Madrid, Católica de Murcia UCAM, Marca-CEU San Pablo, Cámara de Comercio de Sevilla y Universidad de Sevilla) and of the master degree in Innovation in Journalism from the Universidad Miguel Hernández from Elche).

He belongs to the research group ‘Media studies for a quality journalism’ from the University of Seville and he has different lines of research: sports journalism, stylebooks and digital storytelling.

Author of nearly twenty articles and papers on Sports Journalism, he has published four books so far: La información y el deporte (Aconcagua Libros, 2005), Libros de estilo y periodismo global en español (Tirant lo Blanch, 2011), Periodismo deportivo de calidad (Fragua, 2011) y Alto y Claro. Guía de pronunciación para la cobertura de grandes eventos deportivos internacionales (Visión Libros, 2013).

Moreover, he is the editor of the collective book Periodismo deportivo de manual (Tirant, 2017), manual written by 16 professors from 10 universities from 4 countries, and is coauthor of the forthcoming Libro de estilo de la Cadena SER (Cadena SER stylebook).

He also works as a an innovation consultant for the Spanish sports daily newspaper Marca (Rizzoli group) and is the author of the academic blog Periodismo Deportivo de Calidad (http://periodismodeportivodecalidad.blogspot.com).

 

PRESENTATION

Prof. aso. José Luis Rojas Torrijos  will talk about „Accountable sports journalism: creating a gateway to showcase ethical codes, stylebooks, ombudsmen and beyond“.

Abstract

Sports journalism has been characterized by a series of ethical deficiencies that have challenged the normative standards and conventional criteria of the profession. These widespread questionable practices include the blurring of the frontiers between journalistic genres; the pervasiveness of rumour; sensationalism; the use of warlike language; the inequalities in relation to gender, race and disability and the lack of variation in the news sources employed. All these ethical shortcomings have diminished the credibility of the professionals working in the sports journalism field.

To address these ethical shortcomings, sports journalists must gain awareness of their accountability to answer for their practice to society at large. Accountability instruments can play an invaluable role in offering guidance and helping journalists and users monitor and criticize the quality of sports content. Thus far, the majority of studies on accountability have focused on the description of traditional and innovative tools and no study to date has provided a map of the existing instruments in sports journalism.

To fill this gap, the objective of this investigation has been to identify and analyse the most relevant accountability instruments in sports journalism. Through the employment of the snowball sampling technique, the fieldwork consisted of monitoring the Internet during a timeframe of 18 months (October 2015 – March 2017) to locate the most relevant instruments in the field. Once these mechanisms were identified, the researchers proceeded to examine them using the qualitative content analysis technique.

Among the instruments that have been implemented within companies, we highlight, on the one hand, the ones produced inside the media (in-house stylebooks promoted by major sports media, recommendations for sports journalists in news agencies and general information outlets, ombudsmen and online chats), and on the other hand instruments produced outside media companies (external codes, recommendations issued by key stakeholders in the world of sport, the largest publications related to media criticism, as well as several scholars’ and citizens’ blogs).

All these instruments are compiled on the platform “Accountable Sports Journalism” (http://accountablesportsjournalism.org).

 

Axel Sierau (moderator)

Axel Sierau (moderator)

Axel Sierau studied sport science at German Sport University Cologne and economics at the University of Cologne. From 1995-2008 he was member of the Institute of Sport Economics and Sport Management of German Sport University Cologne. His last main focus was to organize the German Sport Economics Conferences. Since 1998 he is entrepreneur in the field of (sport-) marketing and events.

As a handball player he was also responsible for the team of Cologne Universities and with it successful in 2006 and 2009 as German Champion as well as in 2008 on third Place in European Championships in Nis/Serbia.

From 2008 to 2013 he was initiator and co-founder of enterprise “Sport Meets Charity” (CSR in sports). Since 2012 he is lecturer at macromedia university of applied sciences in Cologne in the topic fields of management in economics, journalism, sports, events, fairs and conferences.

This year already for the sixth time he was responsible as organizer and speaker for the Club Manager Seminar of European Handball Federation in the time before the final4 weekend in Cologne at the beginning of June. Since April this year he is member of EHF Scientific Network Group of Specialists.

Current he is project manager and fundraiser of foundation “memory of city” in Cologne. Doing this he is developing projects with Britta Heidemann (Olympic champion in fencing) and soccer first league team 1. FC Köln.

Furthermore since June 2017 he is CEO of SportTreff cooperative. They are organizing networking events in the topic of sports and business.

Examples of publications:

Horch, H.-D.; Heydel, J.; Sierau, A. (Hrsg.) (2004): Events im Sport. Marketing, Management, Finanzierung, Köln.

Horch, H.-D.; Heydel, J.; Sierau, A. (Hrsg.) (2002): Finanzierung des Sports, Aachen.

Horch, H.-D.; Heydel, J.; Sierau, A. (Hrsg.) (1999): Professionalisierung im Sportmanagement, Aachen.

Prof. Dr. Barbara Stelzner

Prof. Dr. Barbara Stelzner

Prof. Dr. Barbara Stelzner is Corporate Communication Director, EMEA for DJI, a global leader in developing and manufacturing innovative drone and camera technology for personal and professional use.

Until 2017, she was Vice Dean of the Media School at Macromedia University where she taught Media and Communication Management.

Before joining Macromedia, Barbara Stelzner spent her career in Great Britain and Ireland as an editor and presenter at the BBC World Service, European Business News and Sky News Ireland. Until 2010, she was Vice President and Director News and Programming at CNBC Europe, the London-based European spin-off of the US economic channel.

Barbara Stelzner studied Art and Film History, German Literature and Modern History in Bonn, Frankfurt am Main and London. After her Masters degree, she earned a Diploma in Film and Television Studies at the Polytechnic of Central London, before she completed her PhD with a dissertation on youth propaganda films in the Third Reich at the University of Bonn.

 

PRESENTATION

Her presentation is titled „Unleashing your imagination. Using innovative aerial imaging technology to enhance story telling in the field of sports communication“.

Abstract

Sports communication, whether PR- or journalism-related, is increasingly picture-led, be it in the form of stills or in the form of moving images. Images taken by still or TV cameras dominate, but a new technology has entered the field: footage provided by civilian drones.

DJI is a global leader in developing and manufacturing civilian drones, aerial imaging and camera stabilization technology for personal and professional use. The Chinese company’s revolutionary products and solutions have been chosen by customers worldwide for applications in filmmaking, construction, emergency response, agriculture and conservation, amongst others. The pioneering status of the company is reflected in research showing it to have a market share of approx. 70% in its field.

Sports communication is another important cornerstone of DJI’s activities. They include sponsor-/ partnerships of and with the World Rally Championship (WRC), the 24-hour race at Nurburgring, the FIS Freestyle Ski & Snowboard World Championships 2017, football clubs and other sports partners.

This presentation will elaborate, from a manufacturer’s perspective, on how drone technology can push image-led sports communication to the next level.

Dr. Sirko Straube

Dr. Sirko Straube

Dr. Sirko Straube studied neurobiology and computer science at the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Germany, where he received his diploma in biology in 2005. From here, he studied object recognition in the human brain at the Department of Human Neurobiology, University of Bremen, Germany.

After completing his dissertation in 2009, Sirko Straube started his career as a senior researcher at the Computational Neuroscience group at the Carl-von-Ossietzky-University Oldenburg, Germany, and at the Robotics Group of the University of Bremen, Germany. In 2010 he joined the Robotics Innovation Center of the German Centre for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI) leading projects focused on human-machine interaction, machine learning, hybrid teams of humans and robots, and advanced training for companies in robotics.

Since 2015, Sirko Straube is the Research & Administrative Manager (RAM) of the Robotics Innovation Center, where he is part of the strategy board of the institute and takes responsibilities for personnel and financial planning. As RAM, he has the role of the deputy director and is involved in cooperation with public and industrial partners. Since 2017, he is also heading the software board of the institute, being responsible for quality management and transparency in software developments.

 

PRESENTATION

In his presentation, Dr. Sirko Straube will focus on Robotics and Artificial Intelligence.

Abstract

In recent years robotics has gained a lot of interest also in the area of artificial intelligence. While systems for a long time have been used as tools to implement classical AI approaches in the area of object recognition, environment representation, path and motion planning etc.. Researchers now begin to understand that the system (robot) itself is part of the question and has to be taken into account when teaching AI questions.

This talk might survey the state of the art in robotics and outline ways to tackle the question of AI in the light of the systems as an integral part of the approach. Future milestones and key achievements will be discussed to show a perspective on how humans and robots can collaborate as a team.

Dr. Carsten Ullrich

Dr. Carsten Ullrich

Dr. Carsten Ullrich is the Deputy Director of the Educational Technology Lab and a visiting researcher at Shanghai Jiao Tong University’s E-Learning Laboratory (China).

As Senior Researcher he is responsible for a series of research projects in the field of technology-based learning and work. Within these he examines requirements for learners and staff arising from today’s highly technically complex working environments, as well as the new opportunities for support which these offer.

Dr. Ullrich’s research tackles technology-based learning, focusing on adaptivity and learner support in the industry 4.0 workplace, medicine, schools and universities. He has more than 100 publications covering adaptivity, web-based learning and mobile learning.

Dr. Ullrich completed his doctorate in computer science at Saarland University in 2008, examining the use of AI technologies to formalise educational knowledge to automatically generate learning materials – his research was published in the ‘Springer Lecture Notes for Artificial Intelligence’ series. In the same year he began a six-year stint as associate professor at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, where he researched web-based and mobile learning in adult education.

From 2009 to 2013 Dr. Ullrich was SJTU’s representative on the EU-IP ‘ROLE – Responsive Open Learning Environments’, and then in 2013 he returned to Germany to take up the role of Deputy Director of the DFKI’s Educational Technology Lab.

 

PRESENTATION

In his presentation, Dr. Carsten Ullrich is talking about “From learning to doing. Can artificial intelligence and the internet of things improve education?”.

Abstract

Artificial Intelligence (AI) enables learning environments that adapt themselves to the individual learner to provide on-the-spot context-dependent assistance and long-term knowledge acquisition support. Systems powered by machine learning methods can predict probable learning successes and failures. Today, however, such systems are mostly applied in digital learning environments as it is difficult to transfer the methods to the analogue, physical world. There, the ongoing digitalization enabled by the Internet of Things (IoT) will open up significant new opportunities for AI-based learning. Studies say that 2020 will see 20 billion connected devices – devices that gather information about the world through sensors, interact with their environment through actors, and are connected through the IoT. In their presentation, Prof. Dr. Igel and Dr. Ullrich will give examples of AI-based learning environments and illustrate the potential of the IoT for education.

Dr. Ina Weh

Dr. Ina Weh

Dr. Ina Weh is physiotherapist, studied culture management and educational science. She received her doctor degree in media communication with the focus on basics of attitudes towards play.

Currently she works as a school consultant and coaches young adults in the transition process from school to working life. Currently she works as a school consultant and coaches young adults in the transition process from school to working life.

 

PRESENTATION

In her presentation, Dr. Ina Weh will focus on „eSports should be played in school“  –  the “eSchool“ project by DGS“.

Abstract

eSports are rapidly gaining in importance: this is where the globally connected free world is coming together to play. As opposed to the situation in Sweden, the United States and Asia, there is still a fierce debate going on in Germany about whether and when to recognise it as a sport and when it will receive non-profit status. We go one step further and demand that eSports will become a part of the school curriculum.

It is uncontested that in our everyday reality we all benefit from the interaction with games and sports. Because the gaming reality makes current areas of conflict open for “paradoxical interventions“ – for actions from a new and unexpected perspective. Above all, it stimulates informal learning processes, allowing people to evaluate themselves and their environment better and to gain emotional stability. Even simulations of violence, as critically as they are observed, can have positive effects on the players. These sports competitions foster the idea of fair play and help making players fit for living together in a peaceful, heterogeneous and multipolar society. Nowadays the interesting areas of conflict appear in global digital networks. Consequently, challenges like eSports are important to stimulate informal learning processes.

The “eSchool project“ takes the value-generating potential of sports into schools. Because future competitiveness as a multiplayer in digital societies is based on education and sportsmanship. But the setting of digital online games also includes the risk of losing the interaction with reality. First, biophysical motivational factors have a particularly strong effect –  and second, the fascination is often viewed with suspicion by the familiar environment of family and school. Integrating eSports into daily school life should thus also prevent teenagers from becoming isolated in a phase of particular emotional instability. That way, interfaces for communication remain active, increasing the possibility to transfer the acquired skills to successful actions in everyday real life.

As the initiator, DGS advocates for a better understanding of eSports throughout society and to make it independent from commercial intentions. Peter Lemcke and Dr Ina Weh will give a dialogue lecture about the basic idea of “eSchool“, its operative aspects, the scientific background and perspective.

Frank Wernecke

Frank Wernecke

Frank Wernecke is founder and CEO of DroneMasters GmbH, a Berlin based incubator for drone related business. With DRONEMASTERS MeetUps, he has created one of the largest networks consisting of experts from business, science and public sectors, who are actively shaping the development and the use of drones, beyond traditional industrial and sectoral boundaries.

He organized the first major indoor drone race in Germany with around 100,000 visitors at CeBIT and invented the world’s first Dronathon, a drone marathon for industrial drones. In September 2017 he hosted the first DRONEMASTERS Kids Drone Race in Berlin.

His main concern is the acceleration of change. For more than 20 years he has been working at the crossroads of digitization, sustainability and communications. At the age of 26, he founded his first company.

Today, he also runs the business of laf.li, a digital agency and jkcampaign, a Berlin based campaigning company. He is founder of the bettermap foundation, a non-profit foundation to localize Points of Social Impact, member of the research group Ethical-Ecological Rating at the Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, partner of the steering committee of TEDxBerlin and founding partner of the entrepreneur network katapult: NOW.

 

PRESENTATION

In his presenation, Frank Wernecke will talk about „DRONEMASTERS – Sports as an innovation driver for an emerging industry“.

Abstract

Sporting competition and record-breaking is a major driver of technical progress. Drones are only at the beginning of their technological development. Sporting competition like drone races can serve as a driver for development and for the verification of record-breaking flights. Thus, sports can play a major role in this emerging ecosystem by providing globally accepted standards for the comparability of technological achievements within a framework of sporting competitions.

The presentation will highlight the rapid development of drones, provide an overview of the short history of drone races and the current state of the international drone racing scene as well as an outlook to the upcoming future of drone racing.

Till Wewer

Till Wewer

Till Wewer went to university in Hamburg, Istanbul, Prague and Luneburg. Currently he concludes his Master Thesis in the master programm Public Economics, Law and Politics at Leuphana University Luneburg. In 2011 he graduated from Bucerius Law School in Hamburg (Bachelor of Laws, LL.B.) and worked in business administration/HR in a private company which provides service for the public.

In 2016’s congress he presented his research on the Hamburg NOlympia Referendum pointing out explanations and motivations including NIMBYism. His further field of research is Open Government & Democracy in a current research project at Bonner Akademie für Forschung und Lehre Praktischer Politik (BAPP).

 

PRESENTATION

He would like to talk about “Budget constraints as link between sports economics and e-sports? An analysis of the development of Hamburg’s total of attendance to professional sports and potential lessons learned for e-sports”.

Abstract

The aim of this research is to initiate the knowledge transfer from Sports Economics to E-Sports based on limited Budgets and the following question: Can an interconnected Budget Constraint be derived from the Total of Attendance to Professional Sport Teams in Hamburg in the last 10 years?

Sports Economics especially for the USA have shown that additional Supply in Sports Entertainment does not barely create additional Demand for leisure activities, but rather leads to a shift within the region due to Budget Limitations in terms of money or time (Baade/ Sanderson 1997; Rosentraub 1997; Schwester 2007). Additional stadium capacities, for example, might lead to an increase in spending related to its visit, but will most certainly decrease spending for restaurants etc. in other parts of the town (Baade 1996; Coats/ Humphrey 2001). Thus, a public strategy or public support should not focus only on the Impact (direkte Wirkung) of a new offer, but as well on its overall costs-and-benefits (Auswirkungen).

This research will analyse the development of the Total of Attendance to Hamburg’s Professional Sport Teams based on the official (descriptive) statistics. The Hamburg case is interesting, since several teams went out of business lately (Handball, Ice Hockey, Volleyball), while others were started from the scratch or increased capacities (Football, Basketball).

Thus, it is assumed that an (strong) interconnection can be found that furthermore indicates the overall Budget Constraint for (comparable) leisure activities within the region. The aim of this research is not only to add the argument of interconnected attendance to the public discussion. But to initiate based on budget limitations the knowledge transfer from Sports Economics to E-Sports. Since an increase in Supply of E-Sports will not only have an independent impact, but as well decrease the Demand for competing offers, like potentially cinemas, concerts or fun sports. Thus, a public strategy should not only focus on those who profit but include measures for those who will be disadvantaged and should to try to get those concerned to participate.

Björn Witte (moderator)

Björn Witte (moderator)

Since 2008 Bjön Witte works as Senior Consultant for Hoeppner Sport- und Markenkommunikation GmbH.  In this position he is responsible for sport marketing and business development. His special interest is the Digitalisation and this impact for brands and companies.

Beside his job he take part at the Master program MBA Entrepreneurship and innovation management at the Ostfalia, University of Applied Science. After his diploma at the Euro Buisness College Hamburg, he got a Bachelor in management and administration from the New College Durham and University of Sunderland.

 

 

Robert Zitzmann

Robert Zitzmann

Robert Zitzmann is Head of Sponsoring & New Business at the Jung von Matt/sports GmbH since 2015 and General Manager at the Sheffield FC. Foundation since 2012.

In his current position he was a.o. responsible for the DKB Handball World Cup Live-Stream, the Center Court at the Düsseldorfer Rheinkirmes and the global communication for the World’s First Football Club (Sheffield FC).

Beyond that, Robert consults some of the biggest JvM-clients on their sports and sponsorship strategy, from planning to rights aquisition and activation. Before joining JvM/SPORTS, Robert worked was responsible for marketing and consulting at the UFA Sports GmbH.

Before that he worked for the media department of the UEFA Champions League and the ATP Masters Series in Madrid, after graduating from the University of Bayreuth as Dipl. Spoec in 2010 (Sportökonomie).

 

PRESENTATION

His presentation, is titled „Disruptive Sports – Best Cases from JvM/SPORTS, Germany’s most awarded sports marketing agency 2014-2017“

Abstract

Jung von Matts/sports has executed some of the most shareable and recognised sports marketing projects over the last recent years, creating significant value for clients like DKB (Digital Livestream of the Handball World Championships 2017), Intersport (I run VR you /w Red Bull) or Sportstadt Düsseldorf (Center Court at the Düsseldorfer Rheinkirmes).

Scientific Board

Prof. Dr. Andreas Hebbel-Seeger

Prof. Dr. Andreas Hebbel-Seeger

Andreas Hebbel-Seeger is a Professor of Media Management at Macromedia University and Head of Media School at Campus Hamburg, Germany. His interests range from photography to technology. He is also interested in education, sports and marketing.

Currently he is involved in an EU-founded project which is investigating on the use of digital games for learning purposes. Furthermore he is working in several research projects on the use of video drones, 360-degree video and VR devices regarding to learning, training and communication in sports.

He studied Educational Science, Sports and German Language Science at the University of Hamburg. After completing his state studies and PH.D., he first completed his internship in the debt service and then joined as a university lecturer at the Department of Sports Science at University of Hamburg.

Later he became professor for digital media at the University of Augsburg at the Institute for Media and Educational Technology and worked as a media consultant for the „Application Committee Universiade Hamburg 2015 GmbH“.

His main focus in research and teaching is on the use of digital media for teaching, learning and marketing purposes. The main focus will be on the conception, implementation and reflection of usage scenarios in virtual worlds in the context of movement and sport.

Prof. Dr. Thomas Horky

Prof. Dr. Thomas Horky

Dr. Thomas Horky, born 1965, is a Professor for Sports Journalism at the Macromedia University of applied sciences in Hamburg. After studying sports science, journalism and linguistics he worked as a trainee journalist for the German press agency dpa and as a freelance journalist for several media.

He was research assistant at the Department of Sports Science at the University of Hamburg and the Hamburg Institute of Sports Journalism as well as a lecturer at the Institute of Sports Journalism at the German Sports University in Cologne.

Since 2009 he is working for the Macromedia University of Applied Sciences in Hamburg. The Head of Media School and Head of Research is member of the editorial board of some international journals (Communication & Sport, International Journal of Sport Communication, Global Sport Business Journal, Modern Sport Communication).

His main research projects are quality of journalism (international comparison), mediasport and staging and sports journalism and entertainment. He wrote several international contributions concerning sports and media, some books and is editor of the German book-series „Sportkommunikation” and „Sport & Kommunikation”.

Prof. Dr. Hans-Jürgen Schulke

Prof. Dr. Hans-Jürgen Schulke

Prof. Dr. Hans-Jürgen Schulke studied Educational and Sports Science at the University of Hamburg. After this he worked as education expert for the Hamburg Sport Youth. After completing his state studies and PH.D., he worked as university lecturer for Sport Science at the University of Bremen. In 1987 he founded the Institute for Health, Sport and Nutrition and in 1998 the Institute for Sport Management. From 1991 until 1995 he was the general secretary for the German Gymnastics Festival (Deutsches Turnfest), the world’s biggest mass sports event.

When he worked as director of the Department of Sports and expert of sport of the Senate for the city of Hamburg, he was responsible for the application of Hamburg for the Olympic Games and the participation from the conference of sports ministers at the FIFA World Cup in 2006. Until 2015 Hans-Jürgen Schulke was professor for media management at the Macromedia University of Media and Communication at Campus Hamburg. He supports the Hamburg Congress on Sports, Economy and Media in the Scientific Board.

Jörg Förster

Jörg Förster

Jörg Förster took the position of the General Managing Director for the University Sport Hamburg in October 1, 2015, and thereby got back to his former workplace, after four years at the Freie Universität Berlin as the Director of the University Sport Service, where he repositioned the institution, especially in the area of ​​internationalization and occupational health management.

From 2003-2011 he was a member of the team of the „Hochschulport Hamburg„, at that time responsible for elite sport consultancy and dual career management at Hamburg universities and event management, especially in the students‘ competition sport.

During this period, he was responsible for, among other things, the organization of about 25 German university championships in 12 sports, one World University Championship and one European University Championship.

Since 1998, he has also been involved in various national and international committees for the further development, quality management and political positioning of university sports as an integral part of the university education.

He took several positions at the German University Sport Federation (adh), the European Network of Academic Sports Services (ENAS), the European Athlete as Student Network (EAS), and the European University Sports Association (EUSA).

Within the scope of various lectures (University Hamburg, Macromedia University Hamburg, University of Applied Science Ansbach, University of Applied Science Wismar), he has dealt with the theme complex marketing – brand development – event management since 2004.